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Edfu Temple at Nile river photo

Ancient Edfu Temple is the second (after Kom Ombo) stop on the Luxor-Aswan Nile cruise, if you sail from Aswan to Luxor. It is a perfectly preserved Egyptian temple dedicated to Horus, a falcon-headed god. 

Horus was the Egyptian god of the sun and sky in the form of a falcon. His parents were Isis and Osiris, the most revered gods of the ancient Egypt. The god of chaos and disorder Seth killed Osiris, and Horus was born to avenge the death of his father.

Horus killed Seth on the site of today Edfu Temple. Initially, small temples dedicated to Horus were built here, but under the Ptolemies, in the period from 237 to 57 B.C., a huge temple complex was constructed here, the second largest temple after the Karnak Temple in Luxor. At the same time at the temple there remained the naos (sanctuary) of much older temple.

Edfu Temple was built only a kilometer from the Nile. And a few centuries after the construction it was almost completely drifted with sand, except the entrance gate. The diggings showed that it was in a very good condition. 

The temple is 137 meters long and 79 meters wide. The height of pylons reaches 39 meters. A courtyard with 32 columns is beyond the huge entrance pylon. From the courtyard you will get in a hypostyle hall with 18 columns and then in a procession hall with 12 columns, and from there you will get into sanctum sanctorum (sanctuary). The boat of Horus is in the center of the sanctuary. 

The inscriptions on the walls of the Edfu Temple represent one of the largest collections of hieroglyphic texts of the Greek period in Egypt. A Horus sculpture of black granite is before the entrance into the temple. Black granite is extremely difficult to process even with modern technologies, and the sculpture was made more than two thousand years ago. In the inner yard there is another, even more complex sculpture of Horus. The sculpture dates back to even earlier period, to the time of Pharaoh Nektanebo.

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Temple of Horus in Edfu. The first pylon of the temple built in 327 B.C. It is the best preserved temple in Egypt
Entrance to the temple is guarded by the falcon god Horus. The sculpture is made ​​of black granite.
Boat of Horus at his sanctuary
Walls of the Horus sanctuary are covered with paintings on religious subjects. The boat of Horus was taken out of the sanctuary during the ceremonies.
Sculpture of Horus, the falcon god, in the sacred boat
Main entrance to the temple. It is the second largest preserved temple after Karnak.
Statues of Horus, the falcon god, are on both sides of the entrance
Courtyard beyond the first pylon was called the "wide court of sacrificial offerings"
Black granite sculpture of Horus at the second pylon. This statue of Horus has a special crown on its head.
Columns in the first courtyard
First hypostyle hall has 18 columns
Column capitals have diverse ornaments
Bas-reliefs on religious subjects on the wall of the temple.
Cartouches on the walls of the hypostyle hall
Bas-reliefs in the Hall of Offerings
Cartouches on the walls of the temple in Edfu
Bas-reliefs on the wall of the hypostyle hall
There are many texts concerning everyday life on the walls of the temple in Edfu
There are many texts concerning everyday life on the walls of the temple in Edfu
Bas-reliefs of black cobras symbolizing the Lower Egypt
There are many texts concerning everyday life on the walls of the temple in Edfu
Traditional representation of Horus, the falcon god, on the Egyptian bas-reliefs
There are many texts concerning everyday life on the walls of the temple in Edfu
Bas-reliefs on the wall of the hypostyle hall
Gate before the first pylon
Columns before the entrance to the temple of Horus
All columns have different capitals
Temple of Horus in Edfu at dawn
Representations of Horus, the falcon god, with varied hats: crown, solar disk, feathered tiara, and crown with a flower
You should take such carriage to get from the embankment of the Nile to the temple of Horus (it will be impossible to get there on foot).